Turkey Stock

Stock from roasted bones will be more subtle than that made from raw bones and meat, but it lends good background flavor to lighter soups and braises. This stock freezes well (portion it into smaller containers for easy thawing), and turkey stock can, of course, always be used in place of chicken stock.



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Yield: about 9 cups
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Ingredients
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    2   tablespoons 
    vegetable oil
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    Turkey carcass from a 12- to 16-pound bird (plus bones and wings, if saved)
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    large onion (unpeeled), halved
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    ribs celery, scrubbed and coarsely chopped
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    large carrot, scrubbed and coarsely chopped
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    1/4  cup 
    brandy
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    1-inch chunk fresh ginger, peeled and sliced
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    bay leaf
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    1   sprig 
    fresh thyme
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    10   
    peppercorns

Directions
1.
Position a rack in the middle of the oven and heat the oven to 425 degrees F. Pour the vegetable oil into a large flameproof roasting pan. Break or chop the turkey carcass into 3 or 4 pieces and put it in the roasting pan, along with the onion, celery, and carrot. Roast for 30 minutes, stirring two or three times to ensure even browning. Transfer the turkey and vegetables to a large stockpot. Pour off and discard any fat from the roasting pan, set the pan over medium heat, and add the brandy. Stir with a wooden spoon, scraping up all the browned bits from the bottom of the pan. When the mixture is bubbling, pour the drippings into the stockpot. Add the ginger, bay leaf, thyme, and peppercorns to the pot. Add about 12 cups cold water (or enough to almost cover the turkey pieces). Bring to a simmer, skim any foam that rises to the top, and then reduce the heat to a very slow simmer. Simmer for 2 hours (if you used more than 12 cups water, you may need to boil it down a bit further for flavor). Strain into a large bowl, cool, and refrigerate overnight. The next day, skim the fat from the top of the stock and then portion it as you like.
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