Brine

A heavily salted water mixture used to pickle or cure vegetables, meats, fish, and seafood.

Recipes

  1. Smoked Turkey Breast

    Soaking the turkey breast in the spicy brown sugar brine helps keep the meat moist and juicy, even after 1 1/2 hours of smoke cooking.

  2. Herb-Butter Roasted Turkey with Pinot Noir Gravy

    To brine the turkey you need space for a 5-gallon pot in your refrigerator. If you have neither the room nor the pot, you can cook the brine in a smaller pan and proceed with one of our alternate brining methods.

  3. Chile-Brined Fresh Ham

    Butcher Ryan Farr of 4505 Meats in San Francisco likes to brine fresh ham in a chile-spiked liquid. The pork skin turns wonderfully crackly in the oven.

More »

Articles

  1. How to Brine Turkey (or How I Learned to Love the Bird)

    Mon, 14 Nov 2011

    Why brine your Thanksgiving turkey ? Well, gravy can ..... diabetes. As any convert will tell you, brine your turkey once, and you’ll probably ..... the next day. So how do you do actually brine a turkey? There are about as many variations

  2. Home-Cured Holiday Ham – First You Brine , Then You Brag

    Tue, 15 Dec 2015

    There are many reasons for making your own holiday ham, but the best one of all, may be the most superficial. After the holidays, as people are standing around the water cooler, bragging how great their glazed carrots were, or how amazing the cranberry sauce came out, you can say, “That sounds great, but did anyone else cure their own ham? I didn’t think so.” Above and beyond establishing your culinary dominance with friends, the other reasons are pretty good too. You can flavor your ham any way you want; you can somewhat control the salt content; and depending on how many people you need to feed, can cure any size cut of pork you want, from a whole leg to a small loin roast. There are thousands of different brine and spice combinations, but the procedure is pretty much the same no matter which way you go. However, there is one thing all these recipes have in common, pink salt. To make a true ham, you’re going to need a curing salt that contains sodium nitrite, which is what gives the meat its pink color, and signature “ham” taste, verses something that just tastes like roast pork. This magical ingredient goes by several names, including Pink Curing Salt #, Insta Cure #1, or the one I used, Prague Powder #1. Yes, you can theoretically use things like celery juice, but long story short, nitrites are nitrites, and it doesn’t matter where they come from. For more info on that, and potential health issues, this article by Michael Ruhlman is a good read. Once the ham is cured, you’ll want to give it a soak to rinse off the brine , and how long you do this can effect how salty your meat is. I prefer just a quick dunk, but you can leave it for as long as 24 hours, which will produce what I’ll call a low-sodium ham. It’s still pink, and flavorful, but barely salty. Experimentation is the only way to figure out how long to you should go, but I wanted to give you the range. If you do want a home-cured ham gracing your Christmas table, I’ve given you just enough time to get it done. A local butcher should be happy to give you a few tablespoons of pink salt, otherwise it’s quite easy to find online. Whether it’s for a holiday dinner or not, I really hope you give this a try. Enjoy! Ingredients: 7 to 10 pound fresh, bone-in pork shoulder “picnic” arm roast (or any large hunk of pork) For the brine (adapted from Ruhlman’s basic ham brine recipe) : 6 quarts water 18 ounces kosher salt (this is about 2 1/4 cups Morton's Kosher Salt, or 3 2/3 cups Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt, as they have difference size grains) 2 cups brown sugar 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon pink salt #1 1 rounded tbsp pickling spice, or any spices you want F or the option al glaze: 1/4 cup Dijon mustard 1/4 cup maple syrup pinch of cayenne pinch of salt   - Once cured, you should smoke and/or roast your ham until it reaches an internal temp of at least 145-150 F.  - For a more detailed video on how I prep a ham for the oven, check out this Crispy Honey-Glazed Ham video .

  3. Behold the Bacon Pig: A Big Break with Thanksgiving Tradition

    Fri, 8 Nov 2013

    Smoke in Da Eye We get it: whether you brine it, deep fry it or smoke it, for some people, Thanksgiving turkey is always going to be, well, a little boring. And we’re

More »

Food Blogs We Love

  1. Cover to Cover 2013: Sides Dishes and Condiments

    Wed, 25 Sep 2013

    Way back when we kicked off the Cover to Cover challenge, we promised an explosion. Well, here you go. The Brussels Sprouts Kimchi, in which the sprouts ferment in a pickling brine for five days, led to an exploding jar...

  2. Apple-Fennel Sauerkraut with Caraway (Part 2)

    Mon, 24 Oct 2011

    to help keep the kraut submerged in the brine ). The leaves in each of our jars were ..... problem was that we didn't have enough brine in the jars. But as we said a few weeks back, we didn't get nearly enough brine out of the cabbage when we massaged it

  3. Apple-Fennel Sauerkraut with Caraway (Part 1)

    Tue, 11 Oct 2011

    this summer. She packs it in water and brine and then stores it at room temperature ..... massage, didn't release nearly enough brine to fill the jars (maybe because of the ..... So we augmented it with a salt water brine . And now it's sitting on a shelf in

More »

How To

  1. How to Make Fried Chicken

    Sat, 1 Jan 2000

    cup buttermilk Cooking oil Directions For brine , in a resealable plastic bag set in a bowl ..... crosswise. Add all chicken pieces to the brine ; seal bag. Chill for 2 to 4 hours; remove chicken from brine . Drain chicken; pat dry with paper towels

  2. Chicken Recipe Finder

    Sat, 1 Jan 2000

    breaded, fried, and baked to a golden brown. Buttermilk fried chicken has always been a family favorite. Don't be surprised by the amount of salt in the buttermilk brine . It gives the fried chicken great flavor your family will love.

Back to Top