Spiced Apple Butter

You can use any kind of apple you prefer but Cortland and Macintosh work best.

Ingredients
  • 6   pounds apples, preferably Cortland or Macintosh, peeled, cored and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2   cups apple cider
  • 3/4  cup Stevia In The Raw® Baker's Bag
  • 1/2  cup Sugar In The Raw®
  • 2   teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2  teaspoon ground cloves
Related Video
What is Aioli--Counter Intelligence

A´oli is a garlic mayonnaise, originally from the Provence region of France. It's used as a condiment for potatoes, fish, and vegetables.

Directions
1. 
In a large stainless steel or other non-reactive pot, combine the apples and cider. Cover, and bring just to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce the heat and simmer until the apples are soft, about 20 minutes. Off the heat, use an immersion blender to whirl the apples to a smooth puree. Or, puree the contents of the pot in a blender, in batches.
2. 
Pour the apple puree into a 4-6 quart slow cooker. Mix in the Stevia In The Raw, Sugar In The Raw, cinnamon, and cloves. Set the slow cooker to high and cook, uncovered, stirring about every 30 minutes, until the butter puree is dark and thick enough to plop from a spoon, 10 to 12 hours. If the apple puree starts to spatter, set the cover in place and position so as much moisture as possible can escape (for an oval slow cooker, rotate the cover 90 degrees; for a round one, place chopsticks across the top of the slow cooker and set the cover on top of them). Be sure the apple butter comes to a boil. If it does not, after it has thickened, return it to the pot and bring to a boil on the stove, stirring constantly to avoid sticking (be careful -- as it will spatter!).
3. 
Meanwhile, place the empty canning jars in a hot water canner or other large pot fitted with a rack or lined with a towel, and fill the pot with water to a depth of 1-inch over their rims, making sure the jars stand upright. Bring to a boil, and boil for 10 minutes to sterilize the jars. Sterilize the lids in a small pot of water by simmering them for 10 minutes.
4. 
Place a folded towel on the counter. Remove the hot sterilized jars, one at a time, from the hot water, drain, and place on the towel. Ladle the hot apple butter into the hot jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Remove all air bubbles and adjust the headspace as needed, by topping off with more apple butter. Using a damp paper towel, wipe around the rim of each jar. Set a flat lid on top and then twist a screw band into place, making it only finger tight.
5. 
Using a jar lifter, return the filled jars of apple butter to the canner. Make sure the water covers the jars by 1 to 2 inches, adding water if needed. Cover, bring the water to a boil, and process the jars for 10 minutes. Remove the lid and let the jars of apple butter sit for 5 minutes. With the jar lifter, remove the processed apple butter and place the jars on a folded towel. Plan for the jars to sit undisturbed for 12 hours. After 1 hour, check the lids; they should be flat when touched in the center. If a jar is not sealed properly and the lid can be pressed down, the contents are still safe to consume, but the jar should be refrigerated immediately and the preserves used within 3 weeks. Properly sealed jars can be stored in a cool place for up to 3 months.

nutrition information

Per Serving: cal. (kcal) 30, carb. (g) 7, fiber (g) 1, Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet
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