Cocktail Sauce

Our standard Cocktail Sauce goes great with seafood. And this is one cocktail sauce that can be made in less than 30 minutes.

See Popular Cocktail Sauce Recipes

How to Make Bloody Mary Cocktail Sauce

Start your next party off right by learning how to make this tangy bloody mary cocktail sauce.

Bloody Mary Cocktail Sauce

Fine Cooking Magazine

This tart and tangy sauce is a twist on a classic Bloody Mary cocktail. Rim your serving dish with celery salt before serving, if you like.

Total: 30 mins

Open Shrimp Toast

Family Circle

Top toast triangles with shrimp cocktail for a light lunch or a tasty appetizer.

Total: 30 mins

Shrimp and Sausage Boil

Better Homes and Gardens

Bring an easy-to-share platter of this low-country favorite recipe to the table and everyone will be impressed. Toss in the lemon halves at the last to squeeze over the shrimp.

Total: 1 hr 30 mins

Shrimp Cocktail with Two Sauces

Atkins - Phase 1

This Recipe is appropriate for ALL 4 Phases of the Atkins Diet. Join Atkins today to sign up for your Free Quick-Start Kit including 3 Atkins Bars and gain access to Free Tools and Community, as well as over 1,500 other Free Atkins-friendly Recipes.

Total: 25 mins

Cocktail Sauce

EatingWell

Fresh dill and celery seed give this cocktail sauce a unique twist.

Total: 5 mins

Fiesta Shrimp Cocktail

Better Homes and Gardens

Serve this pretty shrimp appetizer in a cocktail glass for a fun presentation at your next party.

Vodka, Hot & Spicy -- We Gotcha with Sriracha!

Vodka! How CRAZY can it get? No sooner had we told you about Pinnacle's new Cinnamon-Roll Cinnabon vodka -- so perfect for those breakfast hangovers -- that we heard about another vodka with Sriracha sauce.

TGIF Cocktail! How to Make The Spy Who Loved Me

Cocktail Recipes - The Spy Who Loved Me, an espresso vodka take on the classic White Russian cocktail

How to Mix a Bloody Good Bloody Mary

The Bloody Mary has been called the world's most complex cocktail, but ask anyone who has enjoyed one over brunch, and they'll tell you the drink is well worth the effort. At heart, the Bloody Mary is really a simple mix of vodka and tomato juice, but it's the added ingredients -- everything from Worcestershire sauce to celery stalks -- that give this cocktail its personality. According to most reports, Bloody Marys first appeared in the 1930s, though there is some mystery as to where they made their debut (New York or Paris are the frontrunners).

Gin It Up! How to Stock the Perfect Home Bar

Let's see, you'll need one bourbon, one scotch, one beer -- but not all at once, as the Glee choir would have it. No, if you want to become the best host or hostess in the neighborhood, just download this handy chart from Recipe.com that shows exactly what you need to stock the perfect home bar. Yes, you will need gin, for those killer martinis of yours, and vodka, of course, in case the gang drops over for brunch on Sunday morning.

Shrimp Teriyaki Skewers with Bacon: Best Holiday Appetizer Ever!

For Christmas party entertaining and all the way through the New Year's Eve festivities, we are riding to holiday heaven on the Skewers of Glory -- until each and every guest passes out from overeating! YA-HOOOOOO! These gorgeous appetizers just went up on The Pioneer Woman Cooks; they're also in Ree Drummond's (the Pioneer Woman herself) new 2013 cookbook, A Year of Holidays.

Super Sips: Make a Fresh Bloody Mary

Make the most out of an abundant tomato season with these perfect-for-brunch Fresh Bloody Mary's!

Rhubarb: Cook Once, Eat Twice

I'm happy to see that rhubarb has starting popping up at the farmers market, which means rhubarb chutney is on the menu this week. Traditionally rhubarb is cooked with sugar, then used in desserts (strawberry rhubarb pie--yum!), but I also like to add rhubarb to savory dishes, too.

Fact or Fiction: Alcohol "Cooks Out"

Wine, beer, and spirits aren't just for cocktail hour; alcoholic beverages can also be essential ingredients in marinades, sauces, dips, and desserts. Alcohol intensifies the other flavors and aromas in a dish, and the acidity of some beverages such as wine and beer also acts as a tenderizer. But contrary to conventional wisdom, cooking does not necessarily eliminate all of the alcohol.

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