Rice Recipes

Rice is such a simple pleasure. Whether you have a go-to <a href="/recipes/rice/mexican/">Mexican rice recipe</a> for taco night, heap <a href="/recipes/rice/brown/">brown rice</a> in your stir-fry, or enjoy spicy <a href="/recipes/rice/red-beans/">red beans and rice</a>, there are endless options. Maybe you grew up eating instant rice from a box (shudder) but these days, there are more types of this versatile grain available, and lots of great ways to use it. What you see on supermarket shelves is just a fraction of what's out there - at farmers markets and specialty stores you can find unique heirloom varieties in striking colors with fancy pedigrees. But for most meals, you can find what you need at the market. <a href="/search/?searchTerm=basmati">Basamati rice</a>, traditionally eaten with Indian food, has a long thin grain and an intensely nutty aroma. Jasmine rice, often served with Thai dishes, is very fragrant, with a flavor that's almost floral. So get creative: A <a href="/recipes/rice/pilaf/">pilaf</a> is nice, but what about <a href="/recipes/rice/wild/">wild rice</a> studded with toasted almonds? Or a rich, creamy mushroom <a href="/search/?searchTerm=risotto">risotto</a> made with short-grain Arborio rice? Long-grain varieties cook up light and fluffy, perfect for serving alongside a dinnertime stir-fry. And for dessert? Rice pudding, of course.

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Indian-Spiced Stuffed Eggplant

From EatingWell

Lots of Indian spices flavor these stuffed eggplants. They can be a complete meal, but if you are feeling extra energetic, make this dish part of a multicourse Indian feast along with curried vegetables, basmati rice, yogurt salad and some Indian breads. As a side dish, plan on one-quarter of an eggplant per person.

Indian-Spiced Stuffed Eggplant

Zucchini Rice Casserole

From EatingWell

We pack extra vegetables into this cheesy baked rice casserole. Plus we substitute brown rice for white, reduce the cheese by half and swap turkey sausage for pork sausage. If you're bringing it to a potluck, plan to reheat it before serving.

Zucchini Rice Casserole

Turkey Albondigas Soup

From EatingWell

Albondigas, Spanish for "meatballs," star in the traditional broth-based Mexican soup. Our version uses turkey rather than beef or pork for the meatballs, and we've pumped up the volume of fresh vegetables in the mix.

Turkey Albondigas Soup

Seeded Multigrain Boule

From EatingWell

Yes, this 3-pound, seeded, very attractive loaf seems to call for everything but the kitchen sink, but it's worth it! Not only is it high in fiber, but the blend of seeds and grains lends it a wonderfully nutty flavor, aroma and texture. The boule is baked in a 4- to 6-quart Dutch oven or similar ovenproof casserole dish. A heavy container with a tight-fitting lid works best, as the steam trapped inside the pot helps crisp the crust. Keep in mind that in a very wide-bottomed pot the loaf will spread out and be fairly flat; in a taller, narrower one it will be thicker and have more height (and may take slightly longer to bake through). Recipe by Nancy Baggett for EatingWell.

Seeded Multigrain Boule

Black-Eyed Peas with Pork & Greens

From EatingWell

This boldly flavored spin on Hoppin' John replaces salt pork or bacon with lean pork chops. Plus we've added greens--in this case kale--a traditional accompaniment with the dish. Serve with cornbread and a glass of Spanish rioja.

Black-Eyed Peas with Pork & Greens

Cuban-Style Pork & Rice

From EatingWell

Full of spice and exotic flavors, this Cuban take on the classic Spanish paella is an easy way to feed a hungry crowd. Don't worry if you have leftovers. They can easily be rewarmed in a microwave or combined with eggs to make a Spanish tortilla (omelet); or for a great cold dish, toss the leftover rice with cooked vegetables and a vinaigrette made with lime juice instead of vinegar.

Cuban-Style Pork & Rice

Vegetable Fried Rice

From EatingWell

Nothing could be easier than this light version of fried rice. We've used instant brown rice, but if you have leftover cold rice or can pick some up at a Chinese restaurant on the way home, use that instead and skip Step 1.

Vegetable Fried Rice

Quail with Ginger-Cranberry Pilaf

From EatingWell

Here, we sear quail in a skillet and then finish them in the oven over a bed of pear- and cranberry-studded brown-rice pilaf. Although they look like they might be tricky to prepare, quail couldn't be easier to roast. And the flavor payoff is big - rich, succulent meat that is a dark-meat lover's delight.

Quail with Ginger-Cranberry Pilaf

Red-Wine Risotto

From EatingWell

Rich, red-wine-infused risotto is served as a first course or side dish all over Northern Italy. The type of wine used varies according to region. In Piedmont, a local Barbera or Barbaresco is the wine of choice. Any dry red wine that's good enough to drink can be used in its place.

Red-Wine Risotto

Mock Risotto

From EatingWell

Risotto is hardly effortless fare, what with all that stirring over a hot stove. But instant brown rice and creamy Neufchatel cheese can make a nutty, rich, stand-in version that's sure to be a family favorite. Substitute any vegetables you wish for the asparagus and bell pepper. Make it a Meal: Paired with a salad, this is a perfect vegetarian main course, or serve as a side dish with grilled chicken or steak.

Mock Risotto

Baked Risotto Primavera

From EatingWell

This updated spring classic calls for nutty-tasting short-grain brown rice instead of the traditional white arborio. Because the cooking time is longer with whole-grain rice, this risotto is cooked in the oven rather than on the stovetop, eliminating the need for almost constant stirring.

Baked Risotto Primavera

Butternut Squash Pilaf

From EatingWell

Grated butternut squash adds color and nutrients to this brown rice pilaf. Greeks like to use winter squash, especially pumpkin, to make savory and sweet pies, fritters and croquettes, casseroles and myriad other dishes with fall's telltale vegetables, but these dishes are virtually unknown outside the country. It's traditionally made with pumpkin, but since most pumpkins in the U.S. are grown for carving jack-o'-lanterns (and not for cooking), we've modified the recipe to work with readily available butternut squash. The original dish calls for Greek pilaf rice, a short-grained, polished rice that is hard to find outside the country, so we've substituted instant brown rice.

Butternut Squash Pilaf

Minted Peas & Rice with Feta

From EatingWell

The flavors of fresh mint and feta enliven this instant brown rice. Toss any leftovers with some cooked shrimp for a satisfying, easy lunch.

Minted Peas & Rice with Feta

Lentil & Bulgur Pilaf with Green & Yellow Squash

From EatingWell

Based on a traditional Lebanese Lenten dish, this recipe makes a terrific meatless meal. Serve with warm whole-wheat flatbread or pita and a dollop of tangy plain yogurt.

Lentil & Bulgur Pilaf with Green & Yellow Squash

Sausage Gumbo

From EatingWell

To keep it simple, we've opted for just the essential ingredients in this rendition of the hearty Creole favorite: sausage, okra, rice and a little spice.

Sausage Gumbo

Smoky Stuffed Peppers

From EatingWell

Turkey sausage and smoked cheese give a flavorful boost to this versatile, somewhat retro dinner. We've speeded it up by microwave-blanching the peppers and using instant brown rice. If possible, choose peppers that will stand upright.

Smoky Stuffed Peppers

Rice Pilaf with Lime & Cashews

From EatingWell

In southern India, this fragrant dish is served during the harvest season. We've made it the traditional way using white rice (though brown rice is nutritionally superior, it is rarely used in India because the oils in the bran cause it to deteriorate faster, reducing its shelf life). If you are committed to eating only whole grains, you can use brown basmati rice (see Variation).

Rice Pilaf with Lime & Cashews

Wild Rice with Dried Apricots & Pistachios

From EatingWell

Colorful apricots, scallions and pistachios make this vibrant dish worthy of any holiday table. Since wild rice (really a grass) does not absorb liquid to the extent that true rice and other grains do, cook it in boiling water and saute the vegetables separately so they stay tender-crisp.

Wild Rice with Dried Apricots & Pistachios

Vegetable & Sausage Skillet Supper

From EatingWell

This satisfying supper is a great way to use up leftover rice and those pesky bits of leftover vegetables that always manage to clog the crisper. Serve with some grated cheese on top and some warm cornbread alongside.

Vegetable & Sausage Skillet Supper

Express Shrimp & Sausage Jambalaya

From EatingWell

You don't have to sacrifice the traditional smoky punch of this Cajun favorite just because you're short on time. All you need is some purchased sausage and quick-cooking brown rice to create a rich, satisfying dinner on any weeknight. Have some sliced berries for dessert to cool off your palate!

Express Shrimp & Sausage Jambalaya

Stuffed Tomatoes with Golden Crumb Topping

From EatingWell

Stuffed tomatoes are classic comfort food. Serve with a mixed green salad studded with garden-fresh vegetables. For vegetarians, omit the beef or turkey.

Stuffed Tomatoes with Golden Crumb Topping

Creamy Tomato Bisque with Mozzarella Crostini

From EatingWell

We use high-in-protein and low-in-fat silken tofu and a bit of rice instead of heavy cream to thicken this French-inspired tomato soup. Topped with a melted-cheese crostini, it's almost like getting your grilled cheese and tomato soup all in one.

Creamy Tomato Bisque with Mozzarella Crostini

Wild Rice with Shiitakes

From EatingWell

Toasted almonds enhance the nutty flavor of wild rice in this simple yet luxurious side dish. You could give it an Asian twist by substituting sesame oil for the butter and adding a drizzle of soy sauce.

Wild Rice with Shiitakes

Greek Lemon Rice Soup

From EatingWell

Smooth silken tofu replaces the eggs in our version of the classic Greek soup. Add an extra drizzle of olive oil on top of each portion to give it an extra-luxurious taste.

Greek Lemon Rice Soup

Sweet & Sour Chicken with Brown Rice

From EatingWell

In about the time it takes to order and pick up Chinese takeout, you can make this much healthier version of sweet & sour chicken. Our version loses all the saturated fat that comes from deep-frying, along with the extra sugar and salt. If you prefer, use tofu instead of chicken, and use your favorite vegetables; just be sure to cut them into similar-size pieces so they all cook at about the same rate.

Sweet & Sour Chicken with Brown Rice

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