Passover Cookies

Dessert tip: For unleavened Passover cookies that turn out moist and light, beat egg whites until they are fluffy, then fold them gently into the batter. Our Passover cookie recipes include tasty dessert ideas for macaroons, meringue cookies, and much more.

See Popular Passover Cookies Recipes

Bittersweet Chocolate Walnut Meringue Kisses

Better Homes and Gardens

Try something new with this bittersweet chocolate kisses recipe. Combine egg whites, walnuts, chocolate and cream of tartar to create a delicious treat.

Passover Mandel Bread

Family Circle

Passover Apricot Squares

Better Homes and Gardens

An "in-law of an in-law" created this Passover version of crumb cake recipe. The results are more like a cookie than cake.

French Filled Macaroons

Better Homes and Gardens

Almonds and coconut flavor these melt-in-your mouth cookies.

Golden Macaroons

Better Homes and Gardens

Pssst. Want to know two sweet secrets to making the best coconutty treats in town? Here they are: Use two kinds of coconut and a hint of honey.

Macadamia Nut Macaroons

Better Homes and Gardens

Coconuts and macadamia nuts flavor these crisp macaroon cookies.

Simple Almond Cookies

Diabetic Living

For a snack or sweet dessert, enjoy one of these flourless cookies. Drizzle chocolate on top for added pizzazz.

Star Mint Meringues

Better Homes and Gardens

Who needs candy canes when you have these striped melt-in-your-mouth treats? Serve these as a snack or dessert at your next party.

6 Inspired Passover Desserts

While it's true that flour isn't allowed in Passover dishes, it doesn't mean you can't create some stunning desserts. Think beyond traditional cakes, cookies, and pies--there are plenty of sweet treats that don't require leavening. Take, for example, our flourless chocolate cake.

Cooking with Kids: Meringue Cookies

Forgotten Cookies (or meringues, as most people know them) are really one of the most simple-to-make desserts on the planet and are the perfect light sweet to serve during Passover. The bonus is that they're especially fun to do with the kids. But what's with the "forgotten" part?

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