Crockpot White Chicken Chili

For a healthy batch of crockpot chicken, white meat is the best choice. From white chicken chili to recipes that include white wine, these recipes for crockpot white-meat chicken are easy to cook and easy to love.

White Chicken Chili

Better Homes and Gardens

If you're looking for an alternative for your usual tomato-based chili, try this slow cooked version with white beans, chicken broth, jalapeno pepper, and garlic.

White Chicken Chili

Family Circle

Chicken Chili with Cilantro Pesto

Family Circle

This comforting chicken chili receives an additional pop of freshness from a dallop of cilantro pesto. Serve with a side of tortilla chips.

Kickin' Chicken Chili

Diabetic Living

Your options are nearly endless when it comes to this slow cooker chili recipe. Scoop it up with tortilla chips, serve it alongside rice and beans or try it in a taco salad.

Chicken Chili

Diabetic Living

Chicken Chili

Better Homes and Gardens

Short on time? Move the slow cooker setting for this fiery hot white chili recipe to high. If you like, serve in store-bought bread bowls.

Fajita-Style Chicken Chili

Family Circle

Fajitas without the fuss! Simply sear chicken breasts, then top with vegetables and beans before slow cooking.

Chunky Chicken Chili

Family Circle

White Bean Chicken Chili

Family Circle

Who needs the beef? This white meat chili is full of flavor since it calls for chicken thighs and oodles of vegetables.

How to Make Chili

Chili is an all-American favorite--and one that lends itself to much interpretation. In fact, once you factor in the regional trends and personal tastes, there may be as many variations on how to make chili as there are people who make it. While most recipes use some combination of the same basic ingredients--meat, beans, peppers, tomatoes and spices--chili aficionados are particular about their tastes.

How to Make Pulled Pork

If there were ever going to be an iconic dish of the South, pulled pork would be a contender. Before the Civil War era, Southerners ate almost five times more pork than beef, which makes sense because pigs were plentiful and relatively easy to care for. In fact, some pigs would be let loose in the forest to thrive on their own, then hunted when necessary. When these pigs were caught and cooked, it became a community celebration, and friends, family, and neighbors would all share in the feast together.

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