Chicken Stuffing Casseroles

No one will know you've used the leftovers when you build them into chicken-and-stuffing casserole. These easy recipes for chicken-and-stuffing casserole could be part of a bountiful feast, including cornbread and herb stuffing laced with fresh or dried herbs. Finish with a side of cranberry sauce and seasonal veggies.

See Popular Chicken Stuffing Casseroles Recipes

How to Make Turkey Stuffing

While the turkey may be the centerpiece of your holiday feast, sometimes it's upstaged by what's inside the bird--the turkey stuffing, or dressing, as some people prefer to call it. Stuffing has been used for centuries in all types of foods, though it's hard to say for sure when knowing how to make turkey stuffing first became essential to creating a proper Thanksgiving feast. Classic turkey stuffing is made with bread, spices and herbs and stuffed inside the main cavity of the bird, though you can cook it separately in a casserole or baking dish, too.

How to Make Cornbread

Cornbread connoisseurs have a long line of people to thank for making this quick bread a mainstay in American cooking. In fact, this staple of Southern and Southwestern cuisine may be one of the most truly American foods there is. Native Americans used corn, or "maize," in cooking all sorts of dishes--including cornbread--for thousands of years before colonists first set food in what we now know as the United States. Since cornbread is leavened with baking powder instead of yeast, it was easy for early settlers to master how to make cornbread even with limited resources. So, it's no wonder the dish caught on. Its unique flavor and texture have kept it a favorite over the years.

How to Make Broccoli Casserole

Although one-pot meals have been around for decades, learning how to make broccoli casserole will provide you with one of the most familiar American versions to date.

How to Saute Mushrooms

Want an elegant mushroom appetizer without the fuss of hand-stuffing mushroom caps? Learn how to saute mushrooms for a simple yet flavorful dish; they're delicious on their own or served on top of crostini. You can use a mixture of mushroom types -- such as shiitake, oyster, or maitake -- to maximize on earthy flavor, but the beauty of sauteing mushrooms is that even white button mushrooms end up golden brown and delicious. The trick to sauteing mushrooms is keeping the heat at medium-high or high: Mushrooms contain a high percentage of water, and high heat helps evaporate the liquid the mushrooms exude during cooking and allows them to brown; use low heat, and the mushrooms will wind up gray and soggy.

How to Make Spinach

Spinach may be one of the first things that come to mind when we speak of the nutritional virtues of dark green leafy vegetables, which are great low-calorie sources of nutrients such as calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C. But it doesn't always top the list of foods people--especially kids--look forward to eating. The trick to making this "super food" a popular dish at your dinner table is knowing how to make spinach delicious and appealing to even the pickiest of eaters.

How to Cook Wild Rice

When you thumb through cookbooks or surf the net looking for instructions on how to cook wild rice, you may be surprised to find out that wild rice isn't a rice at all, but instead a nutritious grain. In fact, it's the only cereal grain that's native to North America.

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