Breakfast Beef Dishes

Hearty, delicious beef can add variety to the meat course offerings at a breakfast or brunch. The meat lovers at your table will love beef for breakfast. Look for ideas on how to make beef go brunch too.

Ranchero Beef Hash

Better Homes and Gardens

This traditional skillet recipe of beef and vegetables topped off with an egg is versatile enough to be served for breakfast, brunch, or as a main dish.

Total: 30 mins

Cheeseburger Quiche

Family Circle
Total: 30 mins

Frizzled Eggs over Garlic Steak and Mushroom Hash

Diabetic Living

Jazzed-up hash brown potatoes go from side dish to main dish with the addition of a grilled piece of steak and a fried egg. Try this recipe for breakfast, lunch or dinner!

Total: 30 mins

How to Cook Cube Steak

Learning how to cook cube steak the right way, and you'll have a flavorful meal that makes you feel like you've eaten in a steakhouse, without the dent in your wallet.

How to Cook Ground Beef

If you know how to cook ground beef, you can serve up a healthy one-dish meal any day of the week. Ground beef became popular as a way to make scraps of fatty beef salable. Originally the meat was chopped finely or minced, but by 1902 butchers were simply running it through the meat grinder twice along with spices and onion, and selling the resulting ground beef as "hamburger." Today ground beef is used in all sorts of dishes, from meatloaf to tacos, and Americans consume approximately 13 billion hamburgers a year.

How to Cook Beef Wellington

A tenderloin steak, pate and puff pastry are the main ingredients in this rich beef dish that is as impressive as it is delicious. Beef Wellington is pricey enough to keep it from being an everyday meal, and it requires a bit of skill and patience to prepare. But once you become an expert on how to cook Beef Wellington, you'll know how to make a gourmet meal that is hard to surpass in flavor and presentation.

How to Make Sloppy Joes

From hamburgers to meatloaf, casseroles to meatballs, ground beef has long been a staple of American home cooking, in large part because it's more affordable than other types and cuts of meat. So it's no wonder that somewhere along the line, someone invented sloppy joes -- deliciously messy sandwiches made with ground beef in a tomato-based sauce that can range from mild to spicy -- as a means of stretching the amount of beef they had on hand to feed a few more.

How to Make Tortillas

Tortillas are a staple of Mexican cuisine, used in tostadas, burritos, tacos, enchiladas and many other dishes. If you're a true fan of authentic Mexican food, it's worth learning how to make tortillas from scratch. They're delicious, and far easier to make than you might think.

How to Make Enchiladas

Enchiladas have been around in one form or another since the pre-Columbian times. In fact, it seems that people were figuring out how to make enchiladas almost as long as there have been tortillas. The ancient Aztecs made enchilada dishes consisting of a fried tortilla topped with salsa and cheese, covered by another tortilla and topped off with a fried egg. Though these dishes existed for centuries, the term "enchilada" (which literally means "chili filled") wasn't coined until the 19th century, and the original dish has been all but completely transformed since its early days.

How to Make Beef Stew

If you've never made beef stew, you might think it's complicated to put together or will break the family budget. Not true. Beef stew is actually one of the easiest and most economical meals you can serve. Once you've browned the meat and chopped your vegetables, the ingredients simmer away without constant tending.

How To Cook a Filet Mignon

Once you've learned how to cook filet mignon that is tender and juicy, you can serve a restaurant-quality meal any time you want right in your own home. A tenderloin is a pricey cut of beef, but there's little to no waste and nothing says "I love you" more than a perfectly cooked filet mignon, so it's a great choice for special occasions.

How to Make Ziti

Just about every Italian joint in the U.S. knows how to make ziti, but why not put it together at home next time you're craving a hearty, red-sauce meal? Ziti--also referred to as baked ziti, depending on the preparation--is as honored among Italian-Americans as spaghetti with meatballs.

How to Roast Potatoes

Roasted potatoes are versatile and delicious -- knowing how to roast potatoes is a skill you'll be glad you have, and it's surprisingly easy. You can serve them hot out of the oven, in the classic style, or use them at room temperature to create dishes like the roasted-potato salad below. Leftover roasted potatoes never go to waste: Save them for breakfast and you have instant home fries to go with your bacon and eggs, or use them in a frittata for lunch, paired with a green salad.

How to Cook Asparagus

If your entree is like the star performer of your meal, then your side dishes are the supporting characters. But no matter how good your star is, you won't have a good show without interesting supporting characters, right? What does this mean when it comes to your meal? It means that same old boring steamed broccoli isn't going to cut it this time. But what can you choose instead? Learn how to cook asparagus, and your meal will be a sure-fire hit every night.

How to Make Spinach

Spinach may be one of the first things that come to mind when we speak of the nutritional virtues of dark green leafy vegetables, which are great low-calorie sources of nutrients such as calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C. But it doesn't always top the list of foods people--especially kids--look forward to eating. The trick to making this "super food" a popular dish at your dinner table is knowing how to make spinach delicious and appealing to even the pickiest of eaters.

How to Cook Wild Rice

When you thumb through cookbooks or surf the net looking for instructions on how to cook wild rice, you may be surprised to find out that wild rice isn't a rice at all, but instead a nutritious grain. In fact, it's the only cereal grain that's native to North America.

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