Smoked Beef Brisket

If you have the time, smoked brisket is some of the tenderest beef on the planet. From cold smoked to BBQ smoked beef brisket, these easy recipes make a meal with mashed potatoes and a side of fresh greens.

See Popular Smoked Beef Brisket Recipes

Texans' Beef Brisket

Better Homes and Gardens

Hungry for barbecue? Try beef brisket that's seasoned with a dry rub, smoked for hours, and served with a beer sauce.

Chef Dean's Never Fail Brisket

Better Homes and Gardens

Try this scrumptious beef brisket recipe served with your favorite barbecue sauce. Directions are included for all three methods: smoker, charcoal grill, and gas grill.

Beef Brisket

Better Homes and Gardens

A popular way to cook brisket is slowly in a smoker. This Davis Dry Rub and homemade barbecue sauce

Texas-Style Brisket with Five-Alarm Sauce

Better Homes and Gardens

This grilled brisket exemplifies the best of Texas barbecue. Cook the beef slowly over mesquite wood chips and slather it with a tangy, spiced brushing sauce and a fiery, sweet red sauce.

How to Cook Beef Brisket

While anyone can wow dinner guests with filet mignon or another expensive cut of meat, a truer test of cooking skill is transforming a less choice cut, such as beef brisket, into a meal that is tantalizing and unforgettably scrumptious. Beef brisket is cut from the breast or chest portion of a cow or calf. It's a tougher, fattier cut of meat than what most of us might prefer, but slow-cooked and drenched in tangy barbecue sauce, beef brisket becomes extraordinary. Knowing how to cook beef brisket just right is a process that begins long before you heat your smoker, grill or oven.

How to Cook Brisket

Good things come to those who wait. Such is the case with how to cook brisket--scrumptious smoked beef so tender that it practically falls apart. The prep work starts the day before, and then it smokes for 8 to 10 hours. If you don't have a smoker, you can cook brisket on a charcoal or gas grill, though in smaller portions. Serve it up with your favorite barbecue sauce, and you'll have a delectable meal that is well worth the wait.

How to Make Corned Beef

Every March, when St. Patrick's Day rolls around, people all across the United States start digging out recipes for how to make corned beef. Corned beef is a beef brisket cured in large grains of salt (called "corns," hence the name). While its association with the Irish holiday is cemented in American culture, corned beef and cabbage is not actually the national dish of Ireland. In fact, the average Irish diet didn't even include beef until the 1900s. Corned beef was a delicacy beyond the reach of most common folk, largely because salt was so expensive and also because in those days the Irish kept cattle primarily for dairy.

How to Cook Corned Beef

Knowing how to cook corned beef is almost a mandatory skill if you have even a drop of Irish blood in your veins. Corned beef is a quintessential American Irish tradition, although many Americans only eat it once a year, on St. Patrick's Day. Corned beef was one of Ireland's main exports until 1825; County Cork was the largest producer for many decades. The British Army often survived on cans of it during their many and bitter campaigns across Europe. Today, however, corned beef is far more popular in America than it is in Ireland.

How to Cook Prime Rib

There are occasions that call for a champagne toast, holiday gatherings that all but require roast turkey or smoked ham, but when you're celebrating something so big you need to pull out all the stops, you'll want to know how to cook prime rib. Prime rib, sometimes called a standing roast, is the piece de resistance of beef roasts. It can be served with or without ribs and can satisfy a hungry crowd. But it's not inexpensive, so you'll want to make sure you get it perfect.

How to Cook Wild Rice

When you thumb through cookbooks or surf the net looking for instructions on how to cook wild rice, you may be surprised to find out that wild rice isn't a rice at all, but instead a nutritious grain. In fact, it's the only cereal grain that's native to North America.

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