Japanese Pork Dishes

Pork is a common Japanese main dish. Try recipes for steamed cabbage and pork, teriyaki flavored pork, or ginger pork as a few examples of Japanese food.

See Popular Japanese Pork Dishes Recipes

Easy Moo-Shu-Style Pork

Better Homes and Gardens

Use coleslaw mix for the vegetables and tortillas for the Mandarin pancakes, and you have a simplified version of traditional mu shu pork.

Total: 20 mins

Asian Pork Skillet

Better Homes and Gardens

Ramen packages get a gourmet upgrade in this fast, vegetable-packed one-pot dinner.

Total: 20 mins

Pork and Noodle Bowl

Better Homes and Gardens

Marinated pork adds bold flavor while crunchy coleslaw lends a colorful component to this spicy Asian spaghetti dinner.

Japanese Cabbage Stew

Better Homes and Gardens

Pork lo Mein

Better Homes and Gardens

While lo mein gets its name from the kind of Chinese noodle traditionally used in the dish, other noodles, including angel hair pasta and vermicelli, easily can be substituted in this slow cooker special.

Pork Teriyaki

Family Circle

How to Cook Stuffed Pork Chops

Sometimes you want a meal without having to worry about multiple side dishes, and learning how to cook stuffed pork chops is a perfect solution.

How to Make Gumbo

Southeastern Louisiana has as many different takes on how to make gumbo as it has gumbo pots. Any number of ingredients common to Cajun country -- shrimp, crab, oysters, chicken, pork, andouille sausage, peppers and okra -- find their way into this simmering stew seasoned to perfection and served over rice.

How to Cook Italian Sausage

Italian sausage comes in countless varieties, including familiar types like pepperoni and salami; the kind of sausage most people refer to when they speak of how to cook Italian sausage is "sweet Italian," "spicy Italian" or "hot Italian" (the latter two are typically the same), and it's found in the pork section of the supermarket. Typically made with pork, peppers and Italian seasonings, Italian sausage is most commonly used in pasta dishes or as a topping for pizza, but it can be the centerpiece of many other dishes as well.

How to Make Cranberry Sauce

It's almost impossible to think of a Thanksgiving feast without cranberry sauce. The turkey, potatoes, gravy and all the other side dishes are important, but cranberry sauce is the finishing touch. Sure, the kind from a can will do in a pinch, but homemade is far better, and you don't have to be an expert chef to learn how to make cranberry sauce from scratch.

How to Cook Asparagus

If your entree is like the star performer of your meal, then your side dishes are the supporting characters. But no matter how good your star is, you won't have a good show without interesting supporting characters, right? What does this mean when it comes to your meal? It means that same old boring steamed broccoli isn't going to cut it this time. But what can you choose instead? Learn how to cook asparagus, and your meal will be a sure-fire hit every night.

How to Cook Wild Rice

When you thumb through cookbooks or surf the net looking for instructions on how to cook wild rice, you may be surprised to find out that wild rice isn't a rice at all, but instead a nutritious grain. In fact, it's the only cereal grain that's native to North America.

How to Make Spinach

Spinach may be one of the first things that come to mind when we speak of the nutritional virtues of dark green leafy vegetables, which are great low-calorie sources of nutrients such as calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C. But it doesn't always top the list of foods people--especially kids--look forward to eating. The trick to making this "super food" a popular dish at your dinner table is knowing how to make spinach delicious and appealing to even the pickiest of eaters.

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