How to Cook

When you're learning to make a dish, a good recipe is only part of the equation. There are hundreds of tricks and techniques involved in the art of cooking, and once you master them, there's almost no recipe you can't conquer. We've got video tutorials and cooking tips from culinary experts to help you feel more confident in the kitchen, whether you're looking for basic cooking techniques or need assistance with more complex food prep methods. If you're frying, barbequing, broiling, or baking, our helpful how-to videos and demonstrations will give you step-by-step instructions, so you're never at a loss behind the stove. Here at Recipe.com, we believe that no cooking technique is too minor to overlook - even something as seemly simple as browning ground beef or cutting up chicken correctly can make a big difference in the outcome of your recipe. So use our library of cooking videos like your own personal cooking school. We can't wait to help you learn!

How to Bake Pork Chops

Most home cooks, at least those who cook for a family with some regularity, know how to bake pork chops and have a few go-to recipes they enjoy. There's room in every recipe box, though, for another easy method for how to bake pork chops. Try this one and it might just become a family favorite.

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash

Pasta lovers who want to cut back on carbs and calories won't regret learning how to cook spaghetti squash. This oblong winter squash has flesh that separates into spaghetti-like strands when you cook it. It's a worthy low-calorie substitute for the real deal, and it boasts a fair amount of vitamins and minerals, too, including vitamins A and C, plus dietary fiber.

How to Cook a Ribeye Steak

While people have different preferences when it comes to which cut of steak is best and why, rib-eyes are a favorite because their marbled texture helps keep them juicy and tender. There are a number of options for how to cook a rib-eye steak, but you can't go wrong with this pan-seared version with a red wine sauce. Shallots and fresh thyme enhance the flavors and aroma of these savory thick and juicy steaks.

How to Bake Acorn Squash

Even people who don't usually like squash have a soft spot for the acorn squash. The ribbed, dark-green skin of this winter squash hides a bright orange interior that is very low in saturated fat and cholesterol but packed with nutrition, including Vitamin A, Vitamin B6, thiamin and magnesium. It's also high in fiber. There are a variety of opinions about how to cook acorn squash. Some people like the old-fashioned method of slicing the squash in half, removing the seeds, filling the cavity with brown sugar and butter and baking it cut-side up. Others like to drizzle honey or maple syrup in the cavity after brushing the squash with melted butter.

How to Microwave a Sweet Potato

When it comes to "fast food" that's also healthy and nutritious, it's hard to beat the convenience of zapping a sweet potato in the microwave. Yet knowing how to microwave a sweet potato might seem like an unimpressive if all you do is plunk it on a plate, plain. With the right toppings, you can transform a sweet potato into a satisfying, delicious main dish. And you don't have to compromise the nutritional value of sweet potatoes, which are a great source for dietary fiber, vitamins A and C, and even calcium and iron.

How to Make Meatloaf

Nothing says everyday home-cooking quite like meatloaf. This comfort food staple has graced American dinner tables for many years--though, like many New World traditions, the dish actually has its roots in the Old World. In fact, its earliest origins date back as far as Fifth-century Rome. It's best known in German, Belgian and Dutch cuisine, however, and can even be considered a cousin to the Italian meatball. Since recipes for how to make meatloaf have been passed down from one generation to the next, there are tons of variations that are probably all qualify as "just like Mom used to make."

How to Make Tomato Soup

Knowing how to make tomato soup is one of those skills every home cook should have -- canned tomato soup don't hold a candle to the flavor and texture of homemade, and it's ridiculously simple to make. The reason this recipe is extra easy is because it uses canned tomatoes, so there's no fretting over what type of tomato to use, or whether the tomatoes are at peak ripeness (in fact, canned tomatoes often have better flavor than what you'll find in the produce section during much of the year).

How to Make Chili

Chili is an all-American favorite--and one that lends itself to much interpretation. In fact, once you factor in the regional trends and personal tastes, there may be as many variations on how to make chili as there are people who make it. While most recipes use some combination of the same basic ingredients--meat, beans, peppers, tomatoes and spices--chili aficionados are particular about their tastes.

How to Make Lasagna

If you love Italian food, you must learn how to make lasagna. The familiar classic is one dish that's always worth the time and effort. Lasagna makes a great party food, because it can be assembled well ahead of time. Then all you have to do is pop it in the oven and you've got enough food to feed a crowd.

How to Make Enchiladas

Enchiladas have been around in one form or another since the pre-Columbian times. In fact, it seems that people were figuring out how to make enchiladas almost as long as there have been tortillas. The ancient Aztecs made enchilada dishes consisting of a fried tortilla topped with salsa and cheese, covered by another tortilla and topped off with a fried egg. Though these dishes existed for centuries, the term "enchilada" (which literally means "chili filled") wasn't coined until the 19th century, and the original dish has been all but completely transformed since its early days.

How to Make Green Bean Casserole

Remember back when Sunday dinners and holidays just weren't complete without everyone's favorite green bean casserole on the table? We all loved those crunchy fried onions topping the creamy blend of mushroom soup and beans. Learning how to make green bean casserole was a new cook's rite of passage, and this recipe sat in almost everyone's recipe box.

How to Make Mashed Potatoes

If your idea of a home-style meal isn't complete without a mouthwatering side of mashed potatoes, you're going to love the satisfaction of learning how to make mashed potatoes from scratch. Homemade mashed potatoes are creamy, filling and so much better than the instant variety. While this tasty side has gotten a bit of a bad rap thanks to the low-carb diet craze, mashed potatoes actually provide a number of essential nutrients, including fiber, protein, calcium, iron and a full 30 percent of your recommended daily intake of vitamin C in just a single serving.

How to Make Potato Casserole

If you're trying hard to stick to your grocery budget, consider learning how to make potato casserole. This cost efficient dish can be a main course on its own when paired with a green salad (add some leftover ham into the recipe if you want more protein!), or makes a versatile side dish that complements almost any entree.

How to Make Deviled Eggs

Once you learn how to make deviled eggs, you will be able to whip up an inexpensive and delicious side dish to bring to picnics, pot luck suppers or any other event where you're asked to bring a dish.

How to Cook Pot Roast in a Crock Pot

Grandma slaved all day over the stove to serve her family a pot roast this tender and flavorful. Lucky for busy cooks today, we know how to cook pot roast in a crock pot and get a similar result with a lot less fuss and bother.

How to Make Meatballs

Ask any cook how to make meatballs and you will find that everyone's recipe is a bit different. There are so many ways to make meatballs that it's often hard to know what recipe to choose. Should you fry them or bake them? Use ground beef or ground turkey? Garlic or no garlic? Cheese or no cheese?

How to Bake Sweet Potatoes

For a sweeter and more nutritious alternative to baked white potatoes, you should take note of how to bake sweet potatoes. While just as filling as their lighter counterparts, sweet potatoes are a dieter's dream--loaded with nutrients, fat-free, satisfying and delicious, and relatively low in both carbs and calories. And you can cook them in much the same way as you would white potatoes.

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